Archive for February, 2008

Quote of the day

“A scientist discovers what exists. An engineer creates what never was.” – Von Karmon

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February 28, 2008 at 3:40 pm 1 comment

Word of the day

 

Electric Arc – An electric arc is an electrical breakdown of a gas which produces an ongoing plasma discharge, resulting from a current flowing through normally nonconductive media such as air. A synonym is arc discharge. The phenomenon was first described by Vasily V. Petrov, a Russian scientist who discovered it in 1802. On a commercial basis, electric arcs are used for welding, plasma cutting, for electrical discharge machining, as an arc lamp in movie theater projectors, and Followspots in stage lighting.

February 28, 2008 at 3:20 pm Leave a comment

Quote of the day

“Action springs not from thought, but from a readiness for responsibility.” – Dietrich Bonhoeffer 

February 27, 2008 at 4:47 pm Leave a comment

Word of the day

Relay – A relay is an electrical switch that opens and closes under the control of another electrical circuit. In the original form, the switch is operated by an electromagnet to open or close one or many sets of contacts. It was invented by Joseph Henry in 1835. Because a relay is able to control an output circuit of higher power than the input circuit, it can be considered to be, in a broad sense, a form of an electrical amplifier

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February 27, 2008 at 12:54 pm Leave a comment

Andre-Marie Ampere

Andre-Marie Ampere (1775-1836), was a French physicist, natural philosopher, and mathematician who is best known for his important contributions to the study of electrodynamics. He was the first to demonstrate that a magnetic field is generated when two parallel wires are charged with electricity. He is generally credited as one of the first to discover electromagnetism. Born January 20, 1775, Ampere was the son of a successful businessman and local government official in Polemieux-auMont-d’Or, a small community near Lyon, France. As a child Ampere spent a great deal of time reading in the library of his family home, and he voraciously consumed books of history, geography, literature, philosophy and the natural sciences. His father taught him Latin and encouraged Ampere to pursue his passion for mathematics. Some historians write that the young Ampere was a math prodigy at a very early age and that he used to work out long mathematical formulas, just for his own personal entertainment, using small pebbles or breadcrumbs to represent groups of numbers.

Even without any formal education Ampère began a career as a science teacher. After teaching for a while in Lyon he accepted positions at institutions of higher learning including the College of France and the Polytechnic School at Paris, where he was a professor of mathematics. It was there that he first conducted important research and experiments into the nature of electrical and magnetic forces. In the early 1820s, after learning about the electromagnetism experiments of Hans Christian Oersted, Ampere began to formulate a combined theory of electricity and magnetism, doing several demonstrations involving magnetic and electrical forces. His work confirmed and validated the discoveries of Oersted while also expanding upon them, helping to accelerate work in the field of electromagnetism around the world.

Ampere’s most significant scholarly paper on the subject of electricity and magnetism, titled Memoir on the Mathematical Theory of Electrodynamic Phenomena, was published in 1826. The theoretical foundation presented in this publication served as the basis for other ideas of the 19th century regarding electricity and magnetism. It helped to inspire research and discoveries by scientists including Faraday, Weber, Thomson, and Maxwell.

Ampere was elected to the prestigious National Institute of Sciences in 1814, and was awarded a chair at the University of France in 1826. There he taught electrodynamics and remained a member of the faculty until his death. He was also a member of the Fellows of the Royal Society of London.

Ampere died June 10, 1836 in Marseilles, France, and was buried in the Montmartre Cemetery in Paris. The ‘ampere’ – the unit for measuring electric current – was named in honor of Ampere.

February 27, 2008 at 12:44 pm Leave a comment

Word of the day

P.C.B – Printed Circuit Board – It is the Insulating board containing conductive tracks for circuit connections. It is used to mechanically support and electrically connect electronic components using conductive pathways, or traces, etched from copper sheets  laminated electrically connect electronic components using conductive pathways, or traces, etched from copper sheets laminated onto a non-conductive substrate. Alternative names are printed wiring board (PWB),and etched wiring board.

February 26, 2008 at 12:55 pm Leave a comment

Microsoft’s bid to take-over Yahoo

Microsoft has once again approached Yahoo!, asking the Sunnyvale based search portal and content destination to come to the table and negotiate a friendly takeover by Microsoft. Microsoft values Yahoo! at $50 billion; the interest by Microsoft is said to be serious. Microsoft has provided more details regarding what can be expected if the company is successful in its proposed takeover of Yahoo. Microsoft chairman Bill Gates said “Microsoft’s search technology can increase more rapidly in the event of a tie-up. The online advertising industry is growing rapidly and is expected to be a $80 billion industry by 2010.” If the deal comes to fruition, the takeover would be one of the largest corporate takeovers in American corporate history, and likely the largest ever in the Tech sector.

When Microsoft attempted to acquire Yahoo for $44.6 billion earlier this month, many wondered if the drama was over after Yahoo said it would not accept a deal that was “grossly undervalued”. But, after rumors suggesting that Yahoo might try to merge with News Corp, and the possibility of a proxy fight over the Board, it looks like the fun has only just begun.

Looking at the other party of the bid, Yahoo seems to be too silent about the take-over. Yahoo chief executive Jerry Yang had said, “We’re taking this proposal Microsoft has submitted to us very seriously. We’ve made a public statement about why we have not accepted the proposal given that it undervalues” Yahoo, he added. “It’s been a galvanizing event for all of us at Yahoo…I think Yahoo is a very unique asset. I’m a little biased.” But this were his words when the bid offer was $44.6 billion. Now when Microsoft has opened its purse wide and offered $50 billion, Yang was quoted saying, “Obviously I think we can’t say a whole lot about the (attempted acquisition) process we’re going through. Everybody has read about everything we’re doing so there’s not much more to add.” Yang said he has been spending a lot of time with the board and “key constituents” discussing the proposal, and executives want to make sure that “where Yahoo goes is the right place” for customers, employees, and shareholders. a

Microsoft publicly announced what it billed as a “generous” offer for Yahoo and said its plan is to combine resources to take on Internet powerhouse Google. Google has come out against the proposed takeover, condemning it as an attack on the freedom of the Internet. Yahoo has received calls from “a number of interested parties” and has a wide range of strategic options, a source close to Yahoo said. Those options include outsourcing online advertising to arch-rival Google, a proven master at pumping revenues from that well.

It would be interesting to see how things shape up with the tune of the takeover and how many more big fishes like Yahoo are to be eaten up and digested by the shark Bill gates. Google on the other hand might take a beating when the billions of revenue are concerned. Still it leads the stand of the rivals of the Microsoft and for now is saving the world from the invisible capitalist imperialism by the name of Microsoft.

 

February 26, 2008 at 7:45 am Leave a comment

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